Confetti Chicken and Rice – Garlic Cheese Biscuits Recipe



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homemade garlic cheese biscuits recipe

Tips:

  • Quick Meatballs - add 2/3 cup of crushed seasoned stuffing mix to 1 lb. hamburger. Mix and roll into balls.
  • Use up stir fry leftovers by adding a little soy sauce to the vegetables and rice. Then spread the mixture on a warm flour tortilla and roll burrito style.
  • Keep a plastic knife in your canisters to level off things like flour or sugar.

 

Menu:

Confetti Chicken and Rice*
Garlic – Cheese Biscuits*
Frozen Fruit Fluff*



Recipes:

This recipe is especially quick if you use leftover chicken and rice in it. I call this type of recipe a dump and mix recipe. It calls for a lot of ingredients but is simple because you are just opening a lot of cans. It could be mixed up ahead of time to pop in the oven when you need it.

Confetti Chicken and Rice

1 can (10 3/4 oz.) cream of chicken soup
1 cup (8 oz.) sour cream
1/2 cup small curd cottage cheese
1 (3 oz.) pkg. cream cheese, softened
3 cups chicken, cooked, cubed
3 cups rice, cooked
1 1/2 cup Monterey Jack or Mozzarella cheese, shredded
1 can (4 oz.) chopped green chilies
1 can (2 1/4 oz.) sliced ripe olives, drained
1/8 tsp. garlic salt
1 1/2 cup crushed corn chips
2 cups shredded lettuce
2 medium tomatoes, chopped

Blend first 4 ingredients well. Add in next 6 ingredients. Pour into a greased 2 quart baking dish and bake uncovered at 350 degrees for 25-30 minutes or until heated through. Just before serving, top with corn chips, lettuce and tomatoes.

 

Garlic Cheese Biscuits Recipe
(from the Dining on a Dime Cookbook)

2 cups flour
2 1/2 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. salt
1 tsp. garlic powder
2 Tbsp. chives (optional)
3/4 cup Cheddar cheese, grated finely
4 Tbsp. shortening
1 cup milk or sour milk

Mix flour, baking powder, salt, garlic powder, chives and Cheddar cheese in a bowl. Cut in shortening with a pastry blender or fork until it resembles cornmeal. Add milk, stirring just enough to combine ingredients. Do not over stir. Drop by tablespoonfuls onto an ungreased cookies sheet and bake at 450 degrees for 15-20 minutes or until golden brown. Makes 10 biscuits.

Note: You could add bits of bacon or pepperoni to this recipe, too.

Frozen Fruit Fluff

3 medium firm bananas, sliced
1 can (29 oz.) peach halves, drained and diced
1 can (21 oz.) cherry pie filling
1 can (14 oz.) sweetened condensed milk
1 carton (8 oz.) whipped topping

Combine everything but whipped topping and mix well. Fold in whipped topping. Pour into a 13×9 pan. Cover and freeze for 8 hours or overnight. Will keep in freezer 1 month.

 

For more quick and easy menus like these to help you make dinner quickly without stressing over making your own menus, check out our Menus On A Dime e-books!

 

Photo By: ohmeaghan

Comments

  1. says

    The chicken and biscuit recipes sound delicious. I will definitely try them. I’m a big fan of casseroles because their flavor sometimes improves a day or two after you’ve made them.

  2. kristine calkins says

    What a wonderful website! I am a single parent of 3 girls and two older boys. I never have money left over or money to buy extras. Finances are always a struggle for me no matter how much I make. Thank you for your inspiration and ideas.

  3. Jana says

    What does “cut in” mean? I have never understood how that is any different than mixing. I guess “fold in” confuses me as well. Any help would be appreciated; I am just learning to cook…something about toddlers that makes a Mommy wake up and realize cooking is important:)

    Love your website!

    • says

      Too funny but true Jana (about the toddler). I am so glad you asked this question. I was wondering yesterday if I should do an article on basic cooking terms and I’m thinking now maybe I should so thanks for asking.

      Cut in is usually used when you make something like biscuits or pie crust. You put all the dry ingredients in a bowl the add the solid fat ( like butter or shortening) on top of them. You then take your fingers or a pastry cutter (picture) and kind of pinch or moosh (important cooking term : ) ) the fat and dry ingredients together until they look crumbly or like a bunch of peas. Then you add the liquid ingredients and work them in usually with your fingers or pastry cutter too. I usually use my fingers.

      To fold is pretty much a very gentle stirring or blending. You kind of use an up and over motion. For example if I was folding whipped cream into strawberries I would gently scoop the cream over the top of the strawberries and keep doing this until all is mixed. The object is not to beat or stir the cream so much it will lose its fluff or air.You probably have done some folding in but just don’t realize it. It is easier then it sounds.

  4. Jana says

    Thanks, Jill!

    I will have to try mooshing:) I would have just thrown it all in a bowls (in the correct order) and mixed with a spoon or blender. Maybe that is why I have always had little success in the kitchen:)

    • says

      Yes you can. Replace equal amounts. In biscuits it will mostly change the flavor although I can tell a slight difference in the lightness but not enough to matter.
      Cookies is where it really is better to use shortening (although I do often interchange it with margarine) if that is what it calls for because it will change the crispness of the cookies and cause them to spread if you use butter in some recipes.

  5. mommakaos says

    I am a foodie, I use part 7UP with my buttermilk in mine and it is really fluffy.
    The best book for terms is The Culinary Dictionary. It tells you everything as you learn more you want to learn more.
    The ability is inate..you just learn the terms and you gain more knowledge.
    Try eveything once, if you enjoy the outcome, try some creativity. Add herbs you like, change up the cheese choice!
    Bon Apetit!!

  6. says

    Hello!
    I just love your emails, and have also ordered your books, love them also!

    a while back, you have a recipe for some type of chicken casserole, and then the readers came back with their comments, i love that part! anyways, one reader came back with her recipe for seasoning chicken to prepare for using in casseroles, do you have any idea what I am talking about, or am i making no sense at all? thanks for any information you can give me. Julie

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